Wilson In Coma After Pocono

Justin Wilson, seen in Detroit in 2013, suffered a severe head injury during the race at Pocono on 23 August 2015. He is listed in critical condition in a coma at Lehigh Valley Health Network Cedar Crest Hospital in Allentown, PA.Photo by Ian Shalapata.

Justin Wilson, seen in Detroit in 2013, suffered a severe head injury during the race at Pocono on 23 August 2015. He is listed in critical condition in a coma at Lehigh Valley Health Network Cedar Crest Hospital in Allentown, PA.
Photo by Ian Shalapata.

(LONG POND, PA) – Ryan Hunter-Reay led a 1-2 American finish ahead of Josef Newgarden in the ABC Supply 500 at Pocono Raceway, and Juan Pablo Montoya’s third-place finish extended his championship points lead heading into the Verizon IndyCar Series season finale August 30.

There were 12 different drivers to lead laps, half of the field, in the 200-lap race on the 2.5-mile triangular oval, and 13 cars retired because of contact or mechanical issues.

There also were 12 caution periods, the 11th yellow flag displayed on Lap 180 for the single-car crash of race leader Sage Karam in Turn 1.

Debris from the incident hit the trailing Justin Wilson’s No. 25 Andretti Autosport Honda. Wilson was transported by helicopter to Lehigh Valley Health Network Cedar Crest Hospital in Allentown, PA, with a severe head injury.

Wilson, 37, from Sheffield, England, is currently in a coma and in critical condition while undergoing further evaluation. As of Monday afternoon, there was no change in Wilson’s condition.

Karam, from nearby Nazareth, PA, was transported by ground to the same hospital for examination of a right foot injury.

Six title contenders remain, and with the GoPro Grand Prix of Sonoma on August 30 carrying double base points, the title remains up for grabs.

Montoya, who has stood atop the standings since winning the season opener on the streets of St Petersburg, FL, in March, entered the third 500-mile race of the season with a nine-point lead over the surging Graham Rahal.

Montoya heads to the 2.385-mile, 12-turn Sonoma Raceway road course with a 34-point advantage over the third-year Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing driver, whose car was involved in contact on a Lap 93 restart.

Scott Dixon, Helio Castroneves, Will Power, and Newgarden also remain eligible for the Astor Cup.

“We took our time and were smart,” said Montoya, who qualified a season-low 19th in the No. 2 Chevrolet. “I think we had a car that could win the race, but it wasn’t worth risking it. We did what we needed to do today.”

Ryan Hunter-Reay.

Ryan Hunter-Reay.

Hunter-Reay, driving the No. 28 Honda for Andretti Autosport, won for the second time this season and 16th time in his Indy car career. Newgarden, also a two-time winner this season in the No. 67  Chevrolet, earned his fourth podium finish of the season.

Power, the reigning series champion, finished fourth in the No. 1 Chevrolet and Carlos Munoz was fifth in the No. 26 Honda for Andretti Autosport.

“We came through the field several times and the team gave me what we needed,” said Hunter-Reay, who overtook rookie Gabby Chaves on Lap 196 in Turn 1 and won under caution. “This team has given me great race cars over the years and this was one of them. I hope the fans enjoyed the show because it was fun in the race car.”

On the next lap, Chaves’ No. 98 Honda was trailing smoke, which caused the final caution. Chaves, who qualified 16th, led 31 laps.

print

Facebook Comments

About the Author

Ian Shalapata
Ian writes for and provides imagery to Square Media Group as well as accepting freelance photographic assignments. In addition, he has contributed to media organizations, sporting groups, and individuals across North America including the Fort Wayne News-Sentinel, Chatham-Kent Sports Network, the Golf Association of Michigan, League 1 Ontario, as well as numerous colleges and universities in Canada and the United States. Email Ian Shalapata
%d bloggers like this: